Centuri

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Centurion 9
Centurion 9

Name

Age
Colony
Birth place {{{birthplace}}}
Birth Name
Birth Date {{{birthdate}}}
Callsign
Nickname Centuri
Introduced The Night the Cylons Landed, Part I
Death The Night the Cylons Landed, Part II
Parents
Siblings
Children
Marital Status
Family Tree View
Role Centurion
Rank
Serial Number {{{serial}}}
Portrayed by Rex Cutter
Centurion 9 is a Cylon
Centurion 9 is a Final Five Cylon
Centurion 9 is a Human/Cylon Hybrid
Centurion 9 is an Original Series Cylon
Additional Information
Centurion 9 in the separate continuity
[[Image:|200px|Centurion 9]]


Centuri, also known as pilot Centurion 9, is the second of two survivors of the crash of the advanced Cylon "A-B" fighter.

Centuri follows the other survivor, Andromus, to a party in New York City (The Night the Cylons Landed, Part I), where everyone assumes he is dressed in an extravagant "spaceman" costume. At the party, he is tasked with finding the emergency keys for admittance into the WQSL radio station, but is unable to find any.

As later ordered, he enters the kitchen to wait there for Andromus. Due to this, he interrupts a conversation between Arnie and Norman Blore. When Arnie goes to microwaves his meatballs, a microwave oven's radiation disables Centuri until Andromus destroys the said microwave.

Centuri helps Andromus kidnap Wolfman Jack, and goes to to Wolfman's radio station with Andromus in preparation to send a distress signal for rescue by other Cylons.

Centuri is damaged during a firefight with Troy and Dillon. Disoriented, the Centurion carries an injured Andromus off of the roof of the radio station to their doom (The Night the Cylons Landed, Part II).

Notes

  • It is never adequately explained how the radiation from a microwave oven overcomes Centuri when Cylons routinely are exposed to much more powerful and malignant radiation with no ill effect. This may be an anti-nuclear political statement inserted into Galactica 1980 by its producers, a statement about perceived health effects of microwave ovens, or simply a clumsy piece of writing.