Season 1 (1978-79)

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Season One
Season One
A season of the Original Series
Discuss this season at the Battlestar Forum
Number of Episodes 21 (list)
Executive Producer(s) Glen A. Larson
US airdates USA 1978-09-17 - 1979-04-29
CAN airdates CAN
UK airdates UK
DVD release USA USA 2004-03-10
UK UK 2004-01-12
Extended Info The only season of the Original Series.
Related Information
IMDb entry
Online Purchasing
Available at Amazon.com's Unbox – [ Purchase]


Summary

After the Cylons' surprise attack destroys the Twelve Colonies, Adama leads a rag-tag fugitive fleet with humanity's last survivors aboard the Battlestar Galactica seeking a shining planet known only as Earth.

Pivotal Plot Points

  • After the devastation at the Battle of Cimtar, the last remaining battlestar, Galactica, provides escort for a 212-ship fleet, the last human survivors of the The Twelve Colonies.
  • While fleeing the Cylons, Commander Adama convinces fleet members to follow his mystical quest: a shining planet, know only as Earth.
  • The fleet takes a rest on the planet Carillon, only to realize that the planet's inhabitants, the Ovions, are in league with the Cylons.
  • Entering into an vast, uncharted magnetic void, the fleet re-emerges at its proverbial homeworld, Kobol, but are followed by the Cylons before the location of Earth can be discerned from the hieroglphics.
  • Staying just ahead of the ever-pursuing Cylons, the fleet must slip past a huge pulsar cannon mounted in the peak of an icy world.
  • The Galactica is reunited with the Pegasus, another battlestar thought destroyed long ago; its roguish, daring commander, Cain, threatens the Cylons - as well as the fleet's unity - as a test of personalities divides the newly-joined crew
  • The Galactica is nearly destroyed in a Cylon suicide attack, which causes an inferno aboard the ship.
  • While encountering the strange Ship of Lights, the Galactica plays host to Count Iblis, who promises to deliver their goals, but at a significant cost.
  • The fleet encounter another force called the Eastern Alliance, which turns out to be not much of a threat; unfortunately, they also shed no new light on the quest for Earth.
  • Mutinies begin occurring: first, Count Baltar escapes from the prison barge and kidnaps members of the Quorum of Twelve; later, an outright mutiny occurs aboard the Celestra.
  • Tired of running, the fleet turns and faces its Cylon foes (albeit with some unconventional means, thanks in part to a captured Cylon Raider) in a major showdown.

Cast

Stars

Co-stars

Recurring stars

Production Crew

Producers

Directors

Writing Staff

Episodes

Season 1 (1978-1979)

Broadcast Production Episode title Airdate
1 1 Saga of a Star World September 17, 1978 (3 hrs)
2 2 Lost Planet of the Gods, Part I September 24
3 2 Lost Planet of the Gods, Part II October 1
4 4 The Lost Warrior October 8
5 5 The Long Patrol October 15
6 3 The Gun on Ice Planet Zero, Part I October 22
7 3 The Gun on Ice Planet Zero, Part II     October 29
8 6 The Magnificent Warriors November 12
9 7 The Young Lords November 19
10 8 The Living Legend, Part I November 26
11 8 The Living Legend, Part II December 3
12 9 Fire in Space December 17
13 10 War of the Gods, Part I January 14, 1979
14 10 War of the Gods, Part II January 21
15 11 The Man with Nine Lives January 28
16 12 Murder on the Rising Star February 18
17 13 Greetings from Earth February 25 (2 hrs)
18 14 Baltar's Escape March 11
19 15 Experiment in Terra March 18
20 16 Take the Celestra April 1
21 17 The Hand of God April 29

Official Statements

Benedict: Being on this set for the past five months has been the most incredible experience any actor in television could have! It's better than being on Charlie's Angels with Farrah back. There's no way to make you understand the amount of money that's being spent. You come in for a shot at 7:30 [A.M.], and the camera doesn't roll until 11:30 [A.M.] because of all the special effects that have to be prepared.[1]
Hatch: It's really no different from being in an acting class. There's a reality, a truth, that I have to find in every scene; and whether the people are five thousand years in the future or five thousand in the past, they're still human beings. They feel and think. we're dealing with bizarre situations – alien hardware, different terminology, spaceships – but we're still human beings who hate, love, wage war ... It is difficult trying to conjure up how a person would react in such unusual situations. That's the hard part: making up a reality for yourself.
[...]
There's another difficulty – with the texture of the show. It's in the blend of drama and comedy. It's a very narrow pathway to tread. I love lightness, comedy, but it's very important to me that it come out of the drama, out of the reality of the situation. Camp can be fun, but it defeats the reality of the moment. The best comedy – like Neil Simon's plays – has a reality, a basic truth rooted in it.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Houston, David (December 1978). "Two Crazy Kind of Guys". Starlog: 24.